Reiki Healing Touch

Are you aware of the fact that our body contains more energy than it actually uses to carry out its activities? Now, let me make a point! I am not talking about the physical energy that we utilize, but about the healing energy which is unseen to us but for sure, is felt by us. This invisible energy is what we call the “life force energy”. The concept of healing energy is well explained by the Japanese technique – Reiki. The word can be divided into two halves: Rei means “The Higher power” and ki means “life energy”. Precisely, it is a spiritually guided life force energy. The basic idea projected by reiki healing touch is that self healing is the path of salvation from ailments.

Reiki: Healing Energy

Therapies use tools and medications for treatment of ailments. But reiki healing therapy uses the energy of the body. Energy that drives our body can be both free-flowing and stagnant. This therapy uses the power of mind to govern the energies of the body and bring it under control. In due course of time, this therapy works wonders in enhancing the physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. We all are aware of a simple truth of life: A relaxed mind leads to a rejuvenated body. This is how a person feels after undergoing a reiki therapy session. A session usually has the reiki practitioner who first seeks the permission of the patient to cure him (here the permission is for the mental confidence and trust of the patient on the practitioner). And then, the reiki practitioner starts with the reiki session with his hands moving over the chakras of the body, aiding in rejuvenating them with sufficient energy. He often makes use of reiki symbols in reiki therapy and massage. In fact, people suffering from chronic ailments like cancer, autoimmune diseases and multiple sclerosis take the aid of these therapy sessions to alleviate the pain. Mental concerns, addiction to drugs, anxiety, panic attacks and destructive habits (like smoking and abusing alcohol) can be treated effectively with reiki healing touch therapy.

Before a person learns about reiki or is keen on attending a reiki therapy session, he is required to know about the chakras. So what are these chakras after all? Chakra is a Sanskrit word that means “wheels”. A wheel which we identify physically is what spins around its fixed axis, slow or fast. But there are similar wheels found in our body too (not physically but as energies). Our body contains 7 major chakras and each one is closely associated with an organ of our body. Below listed are the 7 major chakras.

Chakra Location Organs Purpose Information contained Physical ailments Emotional issues Spiritual Lesson
Root chakra Base of spine Covers the entire spinal column, kidneys, legs, feet, rectum and immune system Kinesthetic feelings and movement Contains instincts, sense of touch, carnal pleasures, pain, superstitions and familial beliefs sciatica, lower back pain, varicose veins, rectal tumors, weakened immune system and depression self-esteem, survival, family, security and survival material and worldly lessons
Navel/Sacral chakra Lower abdomen (Below navel) Contains sexual organs, stomach, upper intestines, gallbladder, liver, spleen, pancreas, middle spine and adrenal glands Enhances fertility and emotional connection Contains emotional feelings (joy, anger, fear, love etc..), controlling patterns, duality and magnetism Urinary infections and disorders, weak libido and pelvic pain money, sex, power, control, creativity, negative feelings (like guilt and blame) Creativity, Manifestation, Valuing relationships and learning to “let go” of past without losing on the lessons
Solar plexus chakra Back of stomach (in solar plexus) Covers upper abdomen, umbilicus to rib cage, liver, middle spine, spleen, kidney, adrenals, small intestines and stomach Enhancing maturity in understanding the emotional aspect of life Contains personality, consciousness of self within the universe (sense of belonging), self-esteem Stomach ulcers, intestinal tumors, diabetes, pancreatitis, indigestion, anorexia/bulimia, hepatitis, cirrhosis, adrenal imbalances, arthritis, colon diseases Loss of self-esteem, fear of rejection, overly sensitive to criticism, indecisiveness Learning to love oneself, respect oneself
Heart Chakra Located in the center of the chest Contains heart, circulatory system, blood, lungs, rib cage, diaphragm, thymus, breasts, esophagus, shoulders, arms, hands Empowerment of self emotionally Contains connection of love through “love strings” with the people we adore and love Cardiovascular conditions, asthma, lung and breast cancers, thoracic spine, pneumonia Love, compassion, confidence, inspiration, hope, despair, hate, envy, fear, jealousy, anger, generosity Humility to forgive, unconditional love, trust and compassion
Throat chakra Located in the neck region (throat) Covers throat, thyroid glands, trachea, neck vertebrae, mouth, teeth, gums, esophagus, parathyroid, hyperthalemus Responsibility for actions taken by self Contains self-knowledge, truth, attitude, sense of hearing, taste and smell Sore throat, mouth ulcers, scoliosis, swollen glands, thyroid dysfunctions, laryngitis, gum or tooth problems, TMJ disorders Personal expression, creativity, addiction, criticism, faith, lack of authority Confession and absolute surrender to divine force
Third eye (forehead) chakra Located right in the center of forehead Covers brain, neurological system, eyes, ears, nose, pituitary, pineal glands Mind development, insight and actions directed by ideas Contains clear vision (symbolic or literal), wisdom, intuition, intellect Brain tumors, strokes, blindness, deafness, seizures, learning disabilities, spinal dysfunctions, panic and depression Fear of truth, discipline, emotional intelligence, concept of reality, confusion and judgment Thinking with open mind and creating a reality check point for self
Crown chakra Located at top of head Covers the top center of the head and the midline above the ears Intuitive knowing and connecting to spirituality Contains duality, magnetism, emotional feelings (joy, anger, fear) and controlling patterns Mystical depression, diseases of the muscular system, skeletal system and the skin, chronic exhaustion, over sensitivity to light, sound and surrounding environment Discovery of the divine, Lack of purpose and direction, loss of meaning or identity, trust, selflessness, humanitarianism, foresight, devotion, inspiration, values and ethics Spirituality

*Please note:

  • Crown chakra is the most powerful chakra and is not much disturbed even in course of curing ailments, pertaining to any side effects.
  • Reiki treatment should be done only by a reiki practitioner and that is the best and the only way. The reiki healing hands of your teacher will initiate the therapy for you.

Now you know how the reiki healing energy helps in stimulating the chakras as each chakra associates with various organs of our body. There are many audio CDs on reiki healing music available in the market. Reiki music serves as an excellent means of inducing sleep. After all, a peaceful sleep plays a major role in enhancing immune system. Deuter’s Reiki Hands of light is an excellent musical CD which contains soothing musical notes that will aid in complete relaxation of the mind and the body. I am suggesting this musical from my personal experience and it has absolutely worked for me.

Reiki is a huge subject and every aspect of reiki cannot be covered in a single day. So wait for more, readers! Will be back with more interesting facts and finds on this subject, in my next article!

Science | Should the NHS fund alternative medicine? | LS

 Added on November 4, 2013  LS Web Editor   , , , , ,

Science | Should the NHS fund alternative medicine?

Science | Should the NHS fund alternative medicine?

Firstly, I want to point out what I mean by alternative medicine. The definition of it is: any practice that is put forward as having the healing effects of medicine but is not based on evidence gathered using the scientific method. Examples include but are not exclusive to: Homeopathy, Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Ayurvedic Medicine, Naturopathy and many more. You could quite feasibly make up your own brand of alternative medicine tomorrow if you chose to.

I want to illustrate a few undeniable facts to set the scene for alternative medicine; Homeopathy normally comes in for the largest amount of criticism due in part to the levels of dilutions involved. Homeopathy is the concept that like cures like and that this effect becomes stronger at a greater dilution, it relies on the as of yet unproven belief that water has memory. A standard homeopathic remedy is 30C; this is an enormous level of dilution and needs to be given some context. If I was to drop a grain of salt into a full bath it would not be dilute enough, perhaps a pond or a lake? No not dilute enough, in fact the entire volume of water on our planet wouldn’t even cover it.

There is not an atom of active ingredient in any standard homeopathic remedies, just the ‘memory’ of one. If you are still not convinced, then ask yourself why and how do homeopathic remedies not have memory for the gallons of sewage they have passed through as well as the intended ‘medicine’?

What’s the harm though of alternative medicine if it is an effective placebo? A great deal is the short answer. Alternative medicine is often used in the place of conventional medicine and not alongside it as in complementary medicine. Recent examples of this have been the promotion of homeopathic anti-malarial kits in place of genuine anti-malarial medication. Individuals die as a result of this promotion and the NHS endorsement of pseudo science is a very dangerous development for patient’s health.

Another fundamental problem with alternative medicine is the lack of regulation, only two branches have their own governing body and the treatments they preach do not have to undergo any testing. This means side effects are unknown; furthermore it’s not even tested to see if it actually works. Wasting NHS resources on anecdotal evidence is unwise and a public injustice. Supporting this field with public money takes funding away from real medicine; that can be genuinely proven to work. It is only a very minor proportion of the NHS budget but takes money away from life saving treatments such as Herceptin for breast cancer patients. Giving it credibility will only fuel the market of deception it occupies and drain time and resources from interventions that may enhance healthcare in the future.

There is no place within the hierarchy of our healthcare service for ardent supporters of alternative medicine such as HRH Prince of Wales or our very own Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt. If alternative medicine works for you then that is brilliant. But you should not expect the taxpayers to foot the bill for something that cannot be proven and can be actively disproven to be effective. If you are in dispute of this fact then you are also in dispute of the effectiveness of any modern medicine as they undergo the same process of evaluation.

Not enough people with common sense or basic scientific knowledge are willing to stand up against this tyranny of ignorance, but hopefully with education this will change.

Jonathan Derrick 

Depressed, anxious older people turn more often to alternative …

Depressed, anxious older people turn more often to alternative medicine – TeleManagement

23Oct

(TeleManagement) Mental state seems to be a factor in the popularity of complementary and alternative medicine, say researchers.
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture or meditation, is popular among older people. A new survey from scientists at Wake Forest University suggests that depressed anxious older people turn more often to alternative medicine. But they do not use CAM for mental symptoms.

Previous work by this group showed that blacks and native Americans over 65 were more likely to use home remedies. But this new study did not show any differences between ethnic groups. Praying for health was also important to the study group of over 30,000 people over 65. As many as 81.7 per cent of those with anxiety or depression used prayer, compared to 65 per cent of those without. The researchers comment that mental disorders like depression among older people are too often accepted as part of the aging process – instead, they should be properly diagnosed and treated, whether by CAM or conventional medicine.

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BREAST CANCER AWARENESS: Yoga offers outlet for stress of …

By Erin Weaver
erweaver@montgomerynews.com

Jessica D’Angelo, owner of Shine Yoga studio in Perkasie, holds a yoga pose. Photo courtesy of Jessica D’Angelo

View and purchase photos

The daunting task of treating breast cancer with harsh physical measures like surgery and chemotherapy can make alternative medicine appealing to those hoping for a gentler approach to treatment.

However, there is a key distinction between alternative medical options and complementary treatment for breast cancer.

Complementary treatment is, as the name implies, a complement to standard treatments for breast cancer. These standard treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and radiation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Alternative medicine is used in place of standard treatments; most alternative treatments are untested and often discouraged by health care professionals. The National Cancer Institute says that alternative treatment providers may make promising claims about their alternative medicine, but most treatments are not proven to be more effective. Studies are underway, however, to learn more about atypical treatments.

The CDC makes it clear that the safest route is to consult a doctor before trying alternative medicine. The most common alternative treatment for cancer is acupuncture, which involves puncturing the skin with needles.

While the NCI found in one study that some women with breast cancer and experiencing joint pain found relief through acupuncture, there is little scientific support to suggest it can cure breast cancer.

While alternative medicine is often advised against, complementary medicine has been found as a viable option for coping with the side effects of breast cancer treatment, especially emotional stress and physical discomfort.

Yoga and meditation have been found to help women cope with cancer by providing a relaxing outlet for frustrations and stress. Jessica D’Angelo, owner of Shine Yoga studio in Perkasie, said that she has had yogis diagnosed with several different kinds of cancer, and many of them have found comfort in yoga.

“I’ve had a lot of cancer survivors and cancer patients say they find yoga to be such a complement to what they’ve been prescribed,” she said.

D’Angelo, like many oncologists, does not advice using yoga instead of standard treatments, but rather as an addition to help deal with the diagnosis and treatment side effects. Continued…

“I’m very against alternative medicine,” she said. “We’d never recommend that here. But for anyone that wants to keep their spirits up while dealing with cancer, yoga is a great way to do that. Yoga maintains and conditions the body’s stamina during treatment.”

Chemotherapy and radiation can take a significant toll on the body, leaving patients exhausted and feeling ill with severe side effects.

“Yoga combines light exercise, meditation and a general feeling of well-being,” D’Angelo said. “It’s a powerful thing to help facilitate someone’s healing.”

Although yoga is not a painkiller, D’Angelo said she finds that, conceptually speaking, it works in a similar way.

“Painkillers help your body relax, and when your body is relaxed, it can rest. And when your body is resting, it can heal itself,” she said. “Yoga is the same way — yoga helps your body relax and rest, which opens your body to healing.”

Meditation in yoga can also provide emotional healing. After leaving a yoga class, D’Angelo said her students feel more relaxed and optimistic.

“Meditation in yoga requires focusing on the positive, and letting negativity go. Doctors talk about your sickness — in a yoga class, we talk about your health,” she said. “When you focus on the positive aspect of your health and well-being, that feeling grows exponentially.”

According to D’Angelo, the light exercise, meditation and relaxation that comes with yoga allows the body to rejuvenate.

“Chemotherapy goes into your body, but it needs to come back out,” she said. “Doing yoga helps refresh the body and stimulates the glandular and endocrine systems in the body. But it’s not a cure. Yoga won’t cure you.”

Curing cancer, D’Angelo emphasized, is a much longer and more complicated journey. Continued…

“It takes a village to cure cancer — doctor, consultants, family and friends are all necessary to physical and emotional healing,” she said. “Yoga is just one part of that.”

Follow Erin Weaver on Twitter @ByErinWeaver.

The daunting task of treating breast cancer with harsh physical measures like surgery and chemotherapy can make alternative medicine appealing to those hoping for a gentler approach to treatment.

However, there is a key distinction between alternative medical options and complementary treatment for breast cancer.

Complementary treatment is, as the name implies, a complement to standard treatments for breast cancer. These standard treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and radiation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Alternative medicine is used in place of standard treatments; most alternative treatments are untested and often discouraged by health care professionals. The National Cancer Institute says that alternative treatment providers may make promising claims about their alternative medicine, but most treatments are not proven to be more effective. Studies are underway, however, to learn more about atypical treatments.

The CDC makes it clear that the safest route is to consult a doctor before trying alternative medicine. The most common alternative treatment for cancer is acupuncture, which involves puncturing the skin with needles.

While the NCI found in one study that some women with breast cancer and experiencing joint pain found relief through acupuncture, there is little scientific support to suggest it can cure breast cancer.

While alternative medicine is often advised against, complementary medicine has been found as a viable option for coping with the side effects of breast cancer treatment, especially emotional stress and physical discomfort.

Yoga and meditation have been found to help women cope with cancer by providing a relaxing outlet for frustrations and stress. Jessica D’Angelo, owner of Shine Yoga studio in Perkasie, said that she has had yogis diagnosed with several different kinds of cancer, and many of them have found comfort in yoga.

“I’ve had a lot of cancer survivors and cancer patients say they find yoga to be such a complement to what they’ve been prescribed,” she said.

D’Angelo, like many oncologists, does not advice using yoga instead of standard treatments, but rather as an addition to help deal with the diagnosis and treatment side effects.

“I’m very against alternative medicine,” she said. “We’d never recommend that here. But for anyone that wants to keep their spirits up while dealing with cancer, yoga is a great way to do that. Yoga maintains and conditions the body’s stamina during treatment.”

Chemotherapy and radiation can take a significant toll on the body, leaving patients exhausted and feeling ill with severe side effects.

“Yoga combines light exercise, meditation and a general feeling of well-being,” D’Angelo said. “It’s a powerful thing to help facilitate someone’s healing.”

Although yoga is not a painkiller, D’Angelo said she finds that, conceptually speaking, it works in a similar way.

“Painkillers help your body relax, and when your body is relaxed, it can rest. And when your body is resting, it can heal itself,” she said. “Yoga is the same way — yoga helps your body relax and rest, which opens your body to healing.”

Meditation in yoga can also provide emotional healing. After leaving a yoga class, D’Angelo said her students feel more relaxed and optimistic.

“Meditation in yoga requires focusing on the positive, and letting negativity go. Doctors talk about your sickness — in a yoga class, we talk about your health,” she said. “When you focus on the positive aspect of your health and well-being, that feeling grows exponentially.”

According to D’Angelo, the light exercise, meditation and relaxation that comes with yoga allows the body to rejuvenate.

“Chemotherapy goes into your body, but it needs to come back out,” she said. “Doing yoga helps refresh the body and stimulates the glandular and endocrine systems in the body. But it’s not a cure. Yoga won’t cure you.”

Curing cancer, D’Angelo emphasized, is a much longer and more complicated journey.

“It takes a village to cure cancer — doctor, consultants, family and friends are all necessary to physical and emotional healing,” she said. “Yoga is just one part of that.”

Follow Erin Weaver on Twitter @ByErinWeaver.